Get inspired by the standout looks from this year’s Best Awards, showcasing the work of New Zealand’s top design talent.

    Some trends transcend the test of time; trends that are still there and sometimes play a leading role. Stripes are currently having a moment

    Interior Clifftops by Sonya Cotter.  Photo/Jackie Meiring
    Interior Clifftops by Sonya Cotter. Photo/Jackie Meiring

    2. BLOBBY BATHS, BLOBBY SOFAS, EVERYTHING BLOBBY

    Organic shapes remain very fashionable. The last time we saw so many designer curves was during the first half of the last century, when the Art Deco movement spawned soft, plunging lines in everything from visual arts to architecture, interiors and product design. Curvy pieces started popping up again a few years ago and are now found in a wide range of items, from mirrors to rounded sofas and sculptural tables. The popularity of curves is undoubtedly due to the fact that organic shapes imbue a room with a sense of calm. Flowing lines instantly change the energy of a space, creating a feel-good factor and making a space more inviting and relaxing.

    In Camera by Oli Booth Architecture.  Photo/Simon Wilson
    In Camera by Oli Booth Architecture. Photo/Simon Wilson

    When it comes to living a good life, the French did, so it’s no surprise that they invented parquet flooring in the 16th century. Craftsmen have created elaborate designs by fitting blocks of kindling into geometric patterns, creating a look that adds style to any interior, as seen here in this Auckland townhouse designed by Oli Booth Architecture.

    Beach Barn Interior by Alex Fulton Design.  Photo/Simon Devitt
    Beach Barn Interior by Alex Fulton Design. Photo/Simon Devitt

    One of the reasons why tonal bedrooms are preferred is that they are soothing and harmonious. What is tone on tone and why does it work? Tonal colors include a set of tints that are usually lighter or darker shades of the same color. This creamy-toned bathroom by Alex Fulton Design is a prime example. The sandy-toned tiles, crisp white tub, and off-white painted surfaces, with a hint of green, make for a serene and eye-pleasing combination.

    The Cabin by Johnstone Callaghan Architects.  Photo / Sam Hartnett
    The Cabin by Johnstone Callaghan Architects. Photo / Sam Hartnett

    With such a view, all that is required is a high level of curation. This vacation home represents the essence of what a cabin should be in a beautiful location. The design and decor are stripped down, showcasing the beautifully framed moments captured by the large-scale windows.

    Beach Barn Interior by Alex Fulton Design.  Photo/Simon Devitt
    Beach Barn Interior by Alex Fulton Design. Photo/Simon Devitt

    Getting the right light for the right space can create a special mood in your home. This dining nook by Alex Fulton Design features the Hotaru Double Bubble light, representing the perfect unison of traditional craftsmanship with an enduring aesthetic that is as modern as it is timeless. What we love about this trend is that there are paper lantern style pendants for every budget. If you don’t have several hundred dollars to shell out for the Double Bubble, you can pick up a paper pendant from Wah Lee for less than $20. The Hotaru is part of a design range that draws inspiration from the heritage of Japanese lantern making. It was created in collaboration with Twentytwentyone by British design studio Barber Osgerby. Named after the Japanese word for “firefly”, the collection is made by Ozeki & Co Ltd, a famous Japanese company dedicated to making washi paper lanterns since 1891. Ozeki has previously collaborated with many Japanese artists and designers and worked with Isamu Noguchi on the production of his iconic Akari light sculptures.

    Biv Punakaiki by Fabric.  Photo / Stephen Goodenough
    Biv Punakaiki by Fabric. Photo / Stephen Goodenough

    Fabric’s design team took an earth-friendly approach by opting for a sustainably produced wood interior. The finely crafted cross-laminated timber walls and ceiling are perfectly at home in the bush. Externally, the cabin sits within its surroundings without any formal landscaping to minimize the building’s impact on its surroundings.

    Tax Traders by Material Creative.  Photo / Sam Hartnett
    Tax Traders by Material Creative. Photo / Sam Hartnett

    Some of the best interior design trends come from commercial projects, and this office is one example. The lighting, materials and design details would look just as good in any home setting – and that’s intentional. Forward-thinking company, Tax Traders, wanted to create an inspiring environment that would bring joy. The Material Creative design team seized the opportunity to get creative with this stunning kitchen design showcasing a beautiful selection of materials and thoughtful use of color. A monolithic marble bar serves both form and function, while a neon sign hanging above aptly displays the word ‘thrive’. It’s a space designed for that.

    Cardrona cabin by Assembly Architects.  Photo/Simon Devitt
    Cardrona cabin by Assembly Architects. Photo/Simon Devitt

    A gable roof, forever associated with Monopoly board game pieces, never goes out of style. It just gets better with age. The sculptural architecture of this alpine cabin is a fresh take on the design classic, with its strikingly simple wood cladding giving the profile a wonderful modernity.

    Lightly weighted by Oli Booth Architecture.  Photo / Sam Hartnett
    Lightly weighted by Oli Booth Architecture. Photo / Sam Hartnett

    Oli Booth was named Emerging Designer at this year’s Best Awards, and we can see why. Its design philosophy is both directional and avant-garde. Lightly Weighted, its own house, presents a facade that is both sober and intriguing. The architecture, interior and landscaping have all been taken into consideration. Mostly hidden on approach, the two-story house shows how to combine compact living with high-quality design. The Best Awards judges described it as beautifully efficient and elegantly considered in every detail. “Cleverly planned in a small but efficient floor plate, this accommodation does not compromise on quality.” We couldn’t agree more. As far as trends go, this is one we’d like to see a lot more of.

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