Clephanton.  Photo by: Liz Peck Photography.
    Clephanton. Photo by: Liz Peck Photography.

    Last week’s fate of Aurora Borealis was captured by a Nairn-based photographer.

    Photographer Liz Peck was at home in Clephanton when she seized the opportunity to photograph the Dancing Lady.

    She said: “The skies had been cloudy all evening, although west coasters reported great auroras. I looked out at around 10:15 p.m. and the stars were bright. I rushed outside and I took the path in front of the house to encounter a sky that shone and moved, all visible to the naked eye.”

    Clephanton.  Photo by: Liz Peck Photography.
    Clephanton. Photo by: Liz Peck Photography.

    Ms Peck said she was passionate about night sky photography and she described her quest to depict the Northern Lights.

    “There are several adjectives that describe Northern Lights hunters: determined; tough; stubborn, but crazy is probably the most appropriate,” she said.

    “It’s never crowded on freezing nights, so those who are are probably night sky photographers / Northern Lights hunters. We don’t get much sleep.

    January 13. "Coming back from Nairn, the sky cleared and the stars were blazing.  My husband and I got back in the car and drove towards Cawdor, stopping at a parking area just outside Clephanton.  The northern sky was brilliant green with a beautiful purple trim.  Just as I pressed the shutter, a car came down the road, illuminating the gate and field fence, providing a nice foreground".  Photo by: Liz Peck Photography.
    January 13. “When I arrived at the house in Nairn the skies cleared and the stars were blazing. My husband and I got back in the car and drove towards Cawdor, stopping at a rest area just outside from Clephanton. The northern sky was brilliant green with a lovely purple trim. Just as I pressed the shutter, a car drove down the road, illuminating the gate and field fence, providing a nice foreground.” . Photo by: Liz Peck Photography.

    “As with many things, location is key. Dark skies are essential for perfect Northern Lights photography, but here in Nairnshire the view to the north is somewhat spoiled by the constant glow of Cromarty Harbor Firth and often by ships anchored just outside the Harbor in direct view of those photographing the night sky, but we work with what we have!

    Nairn seafront.  Photo by: Liz Peck Photography.
    Nairn seafront. Photo by: Liz Peck Photography.

    “A clear view of the northern horizon is always on the Northern Lights photographer’s wish list. Dark, clear skies, a clear view of the northern horizon and no moon. Perfect recipe.

    “Every photographer has their own style of course, and personally I prefer a wide view of the Northern Lights so I can incorporate a landscape (or seascape) into my shots. For this reason, I prefer there to be a moon for light up my foreground but for others the moon is a curse!There is no right or wrong.

    A rare example of the red glare of the Northern Lights captured on Nairn seafront.  Photo by: Liz Peck Photography.
    A rare example of the red glare of the Northern Lights captured on Nairn seafront. Photo by: Liz Peck Photography.

    “Where to go for the best Northern Lights shots? Well, the whole of Nairn’s seafront is stunning (apart from the Cromarty glow) and you can get some great shots even from the well-lit car park at the harbour. you at East Beach and the streetlights don’t get in the way so much. For darker skies (though still the Cromarty Glow) folks head to Lochindorb. You can usually find a tripod or two hidden by the waters edge! Even Inverness offers good vantage points although exposure is a little trickier because of the city lights.”

    “Of course, the best locations are a well-kept secret!”


    Do you want to react to this article ? If yes, click here to submit your thoughts and they may be published in print.

    Source link

    Leave A Reply